Wolfram

Keep up to date on announcements from Wolfram – Mathematica, Wolfram|Alpha, Wolfram product releases, seminars & conferences, initiatives
  1. Oxford, UK — Wolfram Research launches Version 12 of Mathematica and the Wolfram Language free on the new Raspberry Pi 4. Six years of partnership between Wolfram Research and the Raspberry Pi Foundation have resulted in sophisticated computation being more accessible than ever. Using Mathematica and the Wolfram Language, educators, students and innovators can learn»
  2. I’ve sometimes found it a bit of a struggle to explain what the Wolfram Language really is. Yes, it’s a computer language–a programming language. And it does–in a uniquely productive way, I might add–what standard programming languages do. But that’s only a very small part of the story. And what I’ve finally come to realize»
  3. Today we’re releasing Version 12 of Wolfram Language (and Mathematica) on desktop platforms, and in the Wolfram Cloud. We released Version 11.0 in August 2016, 11.1 in March 2017, 11.2 in September 2017 and 11.3 in March 2018. It’s a big jump from Version 11.3 to Version 12.0. Altogether there are 278 completely new functions,»
  4. Every year at the Wolfram Technology Conference, attendees take part in the One-Liner Competition, a contest to see who can do the most astounding things with 128 characters of Wolfram Language code. Wolfram employees are not allowed to compete out of fairness to our conference visitors, but nevertheless every year I get submissions and requests»
  5. I’m a person who’s only satisfied if I feel I’m being productive. I like figuring things out. I like making things. And I want to do as much of that as I can. And part of being able to do that is to have the best personal infrastructure I can. Over the years I’ve been»
  6. Wow, mathoverflow.net has just hit that 100,000th question! Kudos! Explore some appropriately nerdy data science with our Lead Developer of Scientific Content here.
  7. We call it “Spikey”, and in my life today, it’s everywhere. It comes from a 3D object–a polyhedron that’s called a rhombic hexecontahedron. But what is its story, and how did we come to adopt it as our symbol? Read more here.
  8. In past blog posts, we’ve talked about the Wolfram Language’s built-in, high-level functionality for 3D printing. Today we’re excited to share an example of how some more general functionality in the language is being used to push the boundaries of this technology. Specifically, we’ll look at how computation enables 3D printing of very intricate sugar»
  9. On June 23 we celebrate the 30th anniversary of the launch of Mathematica. Most software from 30 years ago is now long gone. But not Mathematica. In fact, it feels in many ways like even after 30 years, we’re really just getting started. Our mission has always been a big one: to make the world»
  10. Today, we are excited to announce the official launch of the Wolfram Neural Net Repository! A huge amount of work has gone into training or converting around 70 neural net models that now live in the repository, and can be accessed programmatically in the Wolfram Language via NetModel. Neural nets have generated a lot of»
   

   
© Jürgen 2019
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